The Quality of Patterns – A Discussion

A friend forwarded a post from Marianne of The Quilting Edge this weekend, in which she invites discussion on the topic of poorly written patterns. Give it a look, and check out the lively discourse in the comments!

As a pattern designer, I’d like to address a few of the points from this side of the aisle!

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First up: this is part of my internal “mission statement” when I design a pattern. I can’t speak for every other designer, but I do know that my closest designer pals are like me, all striving to do a conscientious job:

  • Mind the fabric. The fabric “generosity” in the materials list is a tricky tightrope to walk. I round up to the nearest 1/4 yard, or add an 1/8 yard if I’m on the 1/4 line. This only changes if the fabric is being used for cuts larger than an 1/8 (say an 8” cut) in which case I give you one extra large cut in case of an oops. C&T’s rule for my upcoming book was add 1/4 yard to my calculations. I do work hard at writing patterns that use up most of their parts… in several of my jelly-strip based ones you can use the strip scraps to make a binding (I happen to love the puzzle of using it all up!)
  • Be honest about my assumptions. At the beginning of every pattern, I tell you what the pattern assumes you already know: how to sew a 1/4” inch, how to rotary cut, how to layer/quilt/bind, etc. In my paper-pieced patterns, I give you links to several tutorials that I think will help you as my assumption on paper-piecing is that you will learn it from a book or video, not the pattern. And it just isn’t cost effective to put all that extra tutorial into the pattern – the paper cost goes up, and most of the time how you do it is not how I do it so it’s wasted.
  • The pattern should be the key to the kingdom on the cover. For me, this means I give you accurate steps to make the exact thing in the picture (exceptions noted above), and maybe a couple of other sizes. If it’s a special technique, then you get ALL the steps. I once bought a pattern that said the equivalent of figure out how big you want to make it, then figure our how many of these blocks fit into that, and have at it. I don’t consider that a pattern.
  • Be honest about the skills required. On the back cover of every pattern, I call out the skills needed. I don’t just say Beginner or Intermediate because I don’t think that’s enough information at all. I list the skills you will actually employ. As I write mostly for the Confident Beginner Peeps, I call out specifically if you need an accurate 1/4” seam, or just a mostly consistent one. If there are templates or paper-piecing involved, I say so. If you will be dealing with bias edges, I say so. I want you to know what you’re getting into, and I especially don’t want you unsuspectingly biting off more than you want to chew.
  • Draw as much as possible. Every one learns differently – some people need all the words, some people need the drawings. I attempt to add computer drawn illustration to as many of the steps as I can. It bulks up the paper, but I think my readers are worth it.
  • Make it MAKE-ABLE. I dream up a lot of things that, in the end, would be horrid to have to make or worse, explain. So I don’t turn those into patterns. Frankly, if my reader could make such a convoluted thing, she is probably figuring it out her own way, and isn’t buying a pattern to do it! Instead, I figure out how to break things down so you don’t sweat through them. I learned a little of this from a composer friend, whose superpower is writing music for each instrument that the musician could play easily (not writing it at the edges of the instrument’s range or sitting on its octave breaks). I fundamentally believe that quilting should be fun, so I try hard to write things that are fun, too.
  • Get it tested. I have a bunch of people on board to check my work. One friend is the master of sorting out my grammar. Another sorts out the flow of steps (“no, Sam, put this before that.”). Another catches the instances where the parts on her design wall don’t look a thing like my drawings. One hates to read the words, so she sees if the pattern can be navigated by the pictures. Another does the opposite, making sure my words actually describe what’s going on. Others spend their precious time and fabric stash actually making the pattern. It really does take a village – and most of them do it FOR FREE.
  • ‘Fess up when you blow it. While all of the above should catch everything, sometimes it doesn’t. When that happens, I fix the pattern, update the print masters and PDF files, and publish the oops on the Patterns/Errata page. And I’m eternally grateful to the person that told me about the problem.
  • Be open to feedback. Critique is necessary to making a better product, even if it stings. I do my best to listen openly to suggestions for improvement, with the understanding that I just won’t be able to please everyone.

And now, my answers to some of the comments on the Quilting Edge:

The shop that sold the pattern is responsible for the quality of the pattern. NO – the buck stops with the author. AND such gatekeeping just isn’t possible for most shop owners. Like you, they buy a pattern based on the appeal of the cover, and sometimes have it made into a sample if they think they can sell fabric or a class for it, but they cannot read the fine print of everything they carry. I would imagine if you let them know a pattern is a mess, they probably won’t buy more of them (or others from the same designer). It’s certainly how we did it in the last store I worked in. But like Target can’t be responsible for the content every crappy DVD it sells, neither can your LQS read and test every single thing. If you want to buy a pattern in a store, you can always ask to open it and give it a once over before paying (every store I’ve been in has been cool with this). I don’t think the LQS should foot a return because they have no way of ensuring the buyer didn’t pirate a copy before returning it – I know this screws over a scrupulous buyer, but unfortunately, there are more folks who wouldn’t think twice about copying and returning a pattern, thinking copyright law is merely a suggestion.

The pattern designer is trying to make a quick buck. If only! There are precious few quick bucks in the pattern business. If the designer does half the steps I listed above, they still worked on that pattern for DAYS. And bought a bunch of fabric too. Let me break this down for you… on a $10 pattern in your local quilt store – $5 goes to the store, $5 to me if I sold it directly to the store. My expenses to make the pattern (paper, printing, bags, assembly) come out of my cut. If one of my distributors sold it to the store, the store still gets $5, the distributor gets $1.50, and I get $3.50. And I still need to cover my expenses in that $3.50. So I get maybe $2.50 of that $10. Yes, I get most of the $$ on a download (minus hosting fees and banking charges) but still. Trust me when I say the buck is not quick.

The free patterns aren’t written well. Part of this is you get what you pay for – truly. Part of it is that a lot of the free patterns are paired with lines of fabric, and they often get written at the 11th hour before the fabric debuts at Quilt Market (and the designers get offered little or no payment). I have been approached by more than one fabric company to produce a fully tested pattern with a 2 week deadline before market for no payment (“we’ll show people your pattern!”) other than an offer of the fabric to make the quilt (not the batting). I certainly don’t do my best work in those circumstances, so I imagine other designers don’t either. It would also help if people stop expecting to always get it for free. If you expect a free download, then you should also expect that the designer or fabric company probably didn’t PAY a team of editors and testers to make sure it’s right. Yes – everyone should make the best product possible regardless (I certainly strive to – my reputation matters to me) – but as I said you often get what you pay for when FREE is involved.

The patterns aren’t well written – part 2. One comment was from a person who released a pattern that she said she had tested, but she also admitted that she doesn’t read other people’s patterns. I would hope that people who take pattern designing seriously take the time to learn their craft and research their competition. That said, you’re still likely to come across something that looks as cute as heck, but is perhaps written by someone who doesn’t have a depth of experience to construct things more easily, or even use commonly understood vocabulary (FWIF, I voraciously read other patterns to see how they are written and illustrated so that I can constantly improve my game – I do it to invest in my business). I wish some of our newest pattern designers would take some time to hone their craft, and learn from their fore-mothers (I’m a HUGE proponent of learning the rules before you go about breaking them). But I also accept that there’s nothing new about the new kids on the block wanting to blaze the trails a new way, and sometimes we get new and exciting techniques from it – yay for innovation! The other side of the coin is that we sometimes get caught when that new fangled stuff doesn’t work out so well. With the ease and speed of pushing content out to the internet, we are going to get a lot of amateur work out there, jumbled in with the good (just look at YouTube). I think you just have to accept that you will occasionally get rick-rolled.

The patterns aren’t written well – part 3. Just like in other industries, there is good and bad, and unfortunately, it’s up to us to determine which is which. One comment said we need a pattern review site – and yes, that would be wonderful. But would you pay to belong to it? Someone has to foot the bill to provide that service to you, and they should be able to profit from their labor, no? Also… would you take the time to write when things are good? I have sold a bunch of patterns in places that allow a review, and no one has written to say if they’re good. I’ve had more emails about my errors than I have had thanking me for making a pattern that was easy to follow. So unless you are willing to review the good, the data will be radically skewed. Another comment said that they felt no responsibility to write to a pattern author – but may I stick my neck out and say I’d rather hear WHY you think my pattern is lacking (in technical terms) than just sit here an wonder why the sales are slack?

In conclusion, the pattern making business is just like any other area of commerce. While, like you, I would love to never buy a bad pattern again, the reality is that there will always be good, and there will always be bad. It doesn’t excuse bad writing in any way, and it is the unfortunate burden of we buyers to sort through that. Hopefully the laws of business will take effect such that the cream rises and the people who write poorly cease to thrive and quit doing it. But I would also offer this… yes, it’s a bummer to pay good money for a pattern that doesn’t live up to your expectations. But I know you’ve also paid for disappointing movies or meals. It happens occasionally. NO ONE CAN PLEASE EVERYONE ALL THE TIME. If it happens to you, please take the time to write the designer to let them know what disappointed you, so that they can improve. The good ones will take this critique and up their game. As for the designers that choose to ignore it, you need not shop them again. And if you DO like it, please, please, please drop us a quick note. It might be the note that stops us from throwing in the towel on the design business. It might just inspire us to make more good things for YOU!

And yes… please comment away – I love a good discussion!

 

 

Stunt sewists needed!

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Hi peeps!

Got a spare hour to sew a block or two for me? I’m working on a new pattern of paper pieced blocks, and I need a hand getting them all sewn for various deadlines that are coming up on me too dang fast, as always.

What I will send you: pre-printed paper pieced patterns, instructions, plenty of fabric to make the block, and a postage paid envelope to get it back to me. You get to keep any leftover fabrics. When the pattern publishes, you get a free copy of it. And my heartfelt gratitude!

Interested? I hope so!

Here’s how to apply…. send your answers to the following questions to me via email at sewsamsew ( a t ) gmail (d o t ) com. Just cut and paste this into the email and answer away.

Your name:

Your email addy:

Your mailing addy:

Your phone number (just in case we need to gab):

How many quilts have you made?:

Your blog (if you have one):

If you don’t, please attach an image or two of your work:

How do you assess your quilting skills? What do you do well, what do you hate doing, etc?:

What’s your comfort level with paper piecing? (note that this particular project is paper-pieced, but if you want me to keep you listed for others that aren’t, let me know):

How are you with deadlines?

Anything else about you that you’d like me to know?

THANK YOU! 

Workshopping with Dingbats!

A couple of weeks back I visited with the Camarillo Quilters Association and they chose to have me teach Dingbats at their workshop.

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Dingbats is one of those sneaky patterns… on first look, you think there’s a set-in circle to contend with. But nope… it’s all straight seams. I just quilt it to look like circles! If you can sew a straight seam with a mostly consistent 1/4”, you got this!

The Camarillo ladies are a friendly and talented bunch, and they took such good care of me. Everyone showed up with great fabric, and we started the day talking about fabric values and contrast. We took the first hour of the day to really look at everyone’s fabric choices as a group and discuss different options. One of my favorite parts of any workshop, as a teacher or student, is checking out everyone else’s fabric… there is always an unexpected combo in there that knocks my socks off, or challenges me to look at a color that I don’t love so much (hello PINK!) in a different way. And was there ever a lot of PINK in this group!

We got to cutting and sewing. And of course, lunch and chocolate. And then back to sewing… and all but one person was well into their second block before they left.

IMG_4431Above was the same Kaffe Fassett stripe, cut in different sections.

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Above was the surprise palette of the day… the deep, espresso brown background was a perfect choice for these funky stripes.

IMG_4435This striped fabric had fish and seahorses in it, and we played with fussy-cutting it for maximum effect against the perfect confetti background.

IMG_4434A sweet pink that will become the center of a baby quilt – the perfect solution when you only want to make one block!

IMG_4429Setting the stripes along the arms of the Dingbat – lovely visual movement!

IMG_4428A beautiful textured background that let the striped fabric shine.

IMG_4427And another cheerfully bright color combo!

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And the “almost got it done” block!

Ladies – thank you for a lovely day!

Want me to come teach at your guild? I would love to! Go here for the info and get in touch!

And home again!

Long Beach was a blast – so good to see old friends and make new ones! A huge shout out to the Kickstarter team, and the team both in the booth and behind the scenes (who I will not name for fear I forget to mention someone). You all know who you are! The patterns were well received, and many people left with some of our sass in their bags and on lapels. I learned so much about how to do this next time – and am looking forward to going again (just not anytime soon!!)

I’ve spent the week unpacking and re-organizing and digitizing and uploading. And trying to catch up with all the stuff that goes by the wayside when you get busy trying to hit big dates. And I’ve even managed a much needed nap or two this week!

And so – moving forward! I’ve updated this site with all the new patterns that were available at Long Beach. Pop over to the Patterns tab to see them, and follow the link there if you’d like to purchase. FYI, I have some GREAT kits for some of the new patterns going at a steal (buy the kit and get the pattern FREE).

And lastly, the new Sew Sassy Buttons. I will be making up some new sets in the next couple of weeks so watch this space for when you can get some more sass on!

New Buttons for Long Beach!

If you’re in SoCal next week, I hope you can squeeze in a visit to the Long Beach International Quilt Festival. It starts Thursday 26th July at 5pm for preview night, and runs through the weekend. Oodles of new quilt stuff for you to touch and take home.

I will be in booth 1542 – at the back end of the 1500 aisle, close to the food court! Pop by and say Hi!

I’m bringing a few new patterns with me, and some kits and fabrics for them too. I will also be carrying the latest darling of the quilt world, Generation Q Magazine! (full disclosure here, the team that made this little gem are friends of mine, and I’m tickled pink to show off their stuff).

And last, but not least… new buttons! Pardon the hasty cell phone image, but here are the latest crop, available for the first time at Long Beach. I re-printed the Ultimate Power Tool in ORANGE especially for this weekend only, so come get yours!
See you there!