I released five new patterns for Spring Quilt Market, and I’m going to take the next few days to introduce them here: first up is Chunky Wee Zippy Pouches.

HDS.030 - ChunkyWeeZippyPouches - Cover - 300dpi

This pattern includes instructions for the three sizes shown on the cover, PLUS instructions to create a pouch of any size – just plug in your numbers (this high, that wide, and this long), do the super simple math that’s laid out for you (really – it’s simple stuff, no stress involved) and cut away. You can buy yours here.

The pouches have a very easy zipper installation – in fact, the whole thing goes together in just eight seams! It’s made of a sandwich of fabrics, fusible, and stabilizer, so the edges are fused and need little finishing. They’re a bit addictive.

I find that anything including zippers is easier to understand with photos than just with drawings, so here’s a quick photo tutorial for the pencil case to help you out. Let’s get started!

1. Choose your fabrics, and cut them according to the pattern. This dimension is 1/2” larger than the fused sandwich so it can be trimmed cleanly after fusing. You also need to cut a layer of Pellon Shape-Flex stabilizer, and a piece of Warm Company’s Steam-A-Seam 2 fusible (either weight is fine). You’ll need a zipper too – make sure you follow the directions on the length for that or you’ll find putting it in to be a pain in the patootie.

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2. Fuse the Shape-Flex to the back of the outer fabric, a Star Wars print.

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3. And fuse the Steam-A-Seam to the wrong side of the inner fabric, a red solid. FYI – the new Steam-A-Seam products now come with handy grid paper on one side, and get this… you can put them through a printer! *

4. Peel the back off the Steam-A-Seam, and adhere the sticky side of this to the Shape-Flex side of the outer fabric. Press well. Notice that I pulled out a non-stick pressing sheet for this step to save getting goop on my ironing board cover. Of course, after I got the first round of goop on it – argh!

IMG_72055. Once the sandwich is together, trim it down to the dimensions listed in the pattern.

6. The pattern tells you to pay attention to which dimension is A, and which is B – in this case B is the longest side, but depending on what you’re making, this isn’t always the case. If you get it wrong you’ll be unpicking a zipper, so mark them clearly!

Press 1/4” under along both B sides of the sandwich. You have 4 layers here, so you’ll need some steam – mind your finger tips!

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7. Open the zipper up all the way, and lay the left side of the zipper under one turned edge of the sandwich. You can use a little glue to hold it in place if you like. I use the walking foot for this (rather than change between the walking foot and zipper foot) – if yours doesn’t track straight (mine does), take the time to change feet.

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8. Stitch about 1/8” in from the fold, down the length of the side. That’s Seam 1, and half a zipper done! Yes, that extra zipper is correct – having it allows you to sew the second side easily.

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9. Sew in the other side of the zipper to the other side of the sandwich – it’ll come together like a tube. Use the extra tail of the zipper to move the first side under and out of the way. Make sure you start the top of the zipper in the same place as you did for the first side – and don’t twist it! Again, a little glue can be helpful. Stitch about 1/8” from the fold.

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10. Sew to the end. Seam 2 and a whole zipper done!

11. Make an inside-out tube by closing the zipper half way. Don’t close it the whole way as it will be a tough job to get it open (from the back side of the zipper) later on. Trust me on this.

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12. Trim off the excess zipper. Don’t use your good scissors! If you have any great ideas for the tail end of a zipper, do share! If not, toss it.

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13. Pop a loop of ribbon under the zipper, matching raw edges, and facing the loop in – this makes a pull tab on the right side at the ends of the zipper when finished.

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14. Stitch across the end, including the loop. I like to stitch across twice for extra strength. That’s Seam 3 done. Repeat on the other end for Seam 4.

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15. Mark the “boxing” squares according to the pattern. Note that the square is INSIDE the seam allowance.

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16. Cut those squares out with some nice scissors with sharp points. I don’t recommend a rotary cutter here because it’s easy to overshoot the line and cut into the seam allowance.

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17. Oops – forgot this before cutting the boxing squares, but we can do it now: run pinking shears, a zigzag blade, or a zigzag stitch along the seam if you’re worried about fraying.

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18. Pull the inner corners of one box apart…

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… and pinch the seam together. Tuck the end seam away from the zipper.

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19. Sew that seam down. Yep… Seam 5 is done.

IMG_723320. Rinse and repeat for the other 3 corners, minding you tuck the end seam down on all of them. Pink or zig the edges if you wish.

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As promised… 8 seams!

21. Open the zipper up and turn the pouch. Poke out the corners with something relatively pointy to make them square and pretty. Fill it full of things.

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22. Enjoy!

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* Disclosure: I have a great relationship with Warm Company.

This pattern was zipped through its paces by Stunt Sewists Janet, Melissa, Kimberly, Megan, Monica, Jean and Barbara – thank you, ladies!