Hunter's Design Studio https://huntersdesignstudio.com Cool patterns + sassy stuff! And the home of We Are $ew Worth It! Thu, 07 Sep 2017 02:23:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.2 https://huntersdesignstudio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/HDS-Logo-2in-150x150.png Hunter's Design Studio https://huntersdesignstudio.com 32 32 79720629 How to Spray Baste a Quilt that’s Larger than your Table – Back to School Blog Hop Day 1 https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/08/15/how-to-spray-baste-a-quilt-thats-larger-than-your-table-back-to-school-blog-hop-day-1/ https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/08/15/how-to-spray-baste-a-quilt-thats-larger-than-your-table-back-to-school-blog-hop-day-1/#comments Tue, 15 Aug 2017 10:00:16 +0000 https://huntersdesignstudio.com/?p=5844

Welcome to Day 1 of the Back to School Blog Hop! I’m kicking it off with a video tutorial on how to spray baste a quilt that’s bigger than your table.

The video is the entire process in one take. If you’re pressed for time and need to skip through some of the repetitive parts of basting a large quilt, here are some places to fast-forward to for catching the high points:

  • 00:30 Different clip options for different tables
  • 01:15 Start basting down the center of the quilt
  • 08:30 Moving the center of the quilt for the first time
  • 13:00 Moving the center of the quilt for the second time
  • 17:00 Moving the center of the quilt for the last time
  • 20:30 Center of the quilt is finished, rotating the quilt and moving to the sides
  • 24:30 Moving the side of the quilt up
  • 27:30 End of first side, moving to second side

I mention some clamps/clips in the opening that work on the thick, white, plastic tables. You can get those here.

If you’re using regular binder clips, buy the big 2” variety (1” capacity).

My favorite spray baste is 505 Spray and Fix Temporary Fabric Adhesive.

All links are not affiliate 🙂

(Huge thanks to Cheryl for loaning me a big quilt to baste!)

If you have any questions, please leave them in the comments and I’ll do my best to answer them!

I hope you follow the rest of the hop as there’s some fantastic content coming your way! BTW, the contributors are from all over the world, so please be patient is everything is not posted at bright and early in your exact timezone! 

Day 1 – August 15 – Sam Hunter: How to spray baste a BIG quilt – www.huntersdesignstudio.com  <—- you are here!

Day 2 – August 16 – Mandy Leins: Thread Dread: removing stray bits after quilting – www.mandalei.com

Day 3 – August 17 – Nancy Stovall: The Sweet Creamy Filling – www.justquiltingpdx.com

Day 4 – August 18 – Ebony Love: 7 Indispensible feet for your sewing machine – www.LoveBugStudios.com

Day 5 – August 19 – Michelle Freedman: Machine throat plates – www.designcamppdx.blogspot.com

Day 6 – August 20 – Teresa Coates: Edge/Under/Top stitching – www.crinkledreams.com

Day 7 – August 21 – Kelly Cole: Ten ways to regain your sew-jo – www.vintagefabricstudio.com

Day 8 – August 22 – Megan Dougherty: Choose to Fuse: tips for working with fusibles for applique – www.thebitchystitcher.com

Day 9 – August 23 – Kim Lapacek: Tricks to being productive while hauling your kids around – www.persimondreams.blogspot.com

Day 10 – August 24 – Yvonne Fuchs: Circuitboard quilting on Domestic and Longarm Machines – www.quiltingjetgirl.com

Day 11 – August 25 – Sandi Hazlewood: Chain Piecing Quilt Blocks Tips – www.craftyplanner.com

Day 12 – August 26 – Juliet van der Heijden: Paper-piecing with children – www.thetartankiwi.com

Day 13 – August 27 – Maddie Kertay: Fabric folding for any storage solution – www.badassquilterssociety.com

Day 14 – August 28 – Cath Hall: Working with Lawn fabric – www.wombatquilts.com

Day 15 – August 29 – Tracy Mooney: Tips for the perfect seam – www.sewmuchcosplay.com

Day 16 – August 30 – Teri Lucas: How to bury thread – www.terificreations.com

Day 17 – August 31 – Debby Brown: Securing machine quilting knots – www. higheredhands.blogspot.com

Day 18 – September 1 – Flaun Cline: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 1) – www.ipleadquilty.com

Day 19 – September 2 – Jessica Darling: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 2) – www.jessicakdarling.com

Day 20 – September 3 – Trish Frankland: A bigger blade really IS better?! – www.persimondreams.blogspot.com

Day 21 – September 4 – Robin Koehler: Tips on how to travel with handwork – www.nestlingsbyrobin.blogspot.com

Day 22 – September 5 – Jane Davidson: How to make scrappy HSTs – www.quiltjane.com

Day 23 – September 6 – Linda Pearl: Low cost tips for organizing your sewing room – www.onequiltingcircle.com

Day 24 – September 7 – Christa Watson – Top 10 tips for quilting on a domestic machine – www.christaquilts.com

Day 25 – September 8 – Sarah Nunes: To Starch or Not to Starch – www.berrybarndesigns.com

Day 26 – September 9 – Suzy Webster: Testing fabric for bleeding – www.websterquilt.blogspot.com

Day 27 – September 10 – Sarah Goer: Machine bind your quilts like a pro – www.sarahgoerquilts.com

Day 28 – September 11 – Vanda Chittenden: Beginner paper-piecing tips – www.chittenden.co.za

Day 29 – September 12 – Cheryl Sleboda: Needle threading tips – www.muppin.com

Day 30 – September 13 – Kim Niedzwiecki – Different thread weights and when to use them – www.gogokim.com

Day 31 – September 14 – Sandra Healy: Conquer Your Fear of Machine Appliqué – www.sandrahealydesigns.com

Day 32 – September 15 – Sandra Starley: The Basics of Antique Quilt Collecting – www.utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

 

]]>
https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/08/15/how-to-spray-baste-a-quilt-thats-larger-than-your-table-back-to-school-blog-hop-day-1/feed/ 26 5844
2017 Back to School Blog Hop for Sewists is coming next week! https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/08/11/2017-back-to-school-blog-hop-for-sewists-is-coming-next-week/ https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/08/11/2017-back-to-school-blog-hop-for-sewists-is-coming-next-week/#comments Fri, 11 Aug 2017 13:00:07 +0000 https://huntersdesignstudio.com/?p=5821

 

The Back to School Blog Hop (for sewists) returns next week! It kicks off with me on Tuesday August 15th, and then we get 32 days of wonderful tips and tricks from my industry colleagues.

Check out the line-up:

Day 1 – August 15 – Sam Hunter: How to spray baste a BIG quilt – www.huntersdesignstudio.com

Day 2 – August 16 – Mandy Leins: Thread Dread: removing stray bits after quilting – www.mandalei.com

Day 3 – August 17 – Nancy Stovall: The Sweet Creamy Filling – www.justquiltingpdx.com

Day 4 – August 18 – Ebony Love: 7 Indispensible feet for your sewing machine – www.LoveBugStudios.com

Day 5 – August 19 – Michelle Freedman: Machine throat plates – www.designcamppdx.blogspot.com

Day 6 – August 20 – Teresa Coates: Edge/Under/Top stitching – www.crinkledreams.com

Day 7 – August 21 – Kelly Cole: Ten ways to regain your sew-jo – www.vintagefabricstudio.com

Day 8 – August 22 – Megan Dougherty: Choose to Fuse: tips for working with fusibles for applique – www.thebitchystitcher.com

Day 9 – August 23 – Kim Lapacek: Tricks to being productive while hauling your kids around – www.persimondreams.blogspot.com

Day 10 – August 24 – Yvonne Fuchs: Circuitboard quilting on Domestic and Longarm Machines – www.quiltingjetgirl.com

Day 11 – August 25 – Sandi Hazlewood: Chain Piecing Quilt Blocks Tips – www.craftyplanner.com

Day 12 – August 26 – Juliet van der Heijden: Paper-piecing with children – www.thetartankiwi.com

Day 13 – August 27 – Maddie Kertay: Fabric folding for any storage solution – www.badassquilterssociety.com

Day 14 – August 28 – Cath Hall: Working with Lawn fabric – www.wombatquilts.com

Day 15 – August 29 – Tracy Mooney: Tips for the perfect seam – www.sewmuchcosplay.com

Day 16 – August 30 – Teri Lucas: How to bury thread – www.terificreations.com

Day 17 – August 31 – Debby Brown: Securing machine quilting knots – www. higheredhands.blogspot.com

Day 18 – September 1 – Flaun Cline: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 1) – www.ipleadquilty.com

Day 19 – September 2 – Jessica Darling: How to put some sparkle in your fabric pull (part 2) – www.jessicakdarling.com

Day 20 – September 3 – Trish Frankland: A bigger blade really IS better?! – www.persimondreams.blogspot.com

Day 21 – September 4 – Robin Koehler: Tips on how to travel with handwork – www.nestlingsbyrobin.blogspot.com

Day 22 – September 5 – Jane Davidson: How to make scrappy HSTs – www.quiltjane.com

Day 23 – September 6 – Linda Pearl: Low cost tips for organizing your sewing room – www.onequiltingcircle.com

Day 24 – September 7 – Christa Watson – Top 10 tips for quilting on a domestic machine – www.christaquilts.com

Day 25 – September 8 – Sarah Nunes: To Starch or Not to Starch – www.berrybarndesigns.com

Day 26 – September 9 – Suzy Webster: Testing fabric for bleeding – www.websterquilt.blogspot.com

Day 27 – September 10 – Sarah Goer: Machine bind your quilts like a pro – www.sarahgoerquilts.com

Day 28 – September 11 – Vanda Chittenden: Beginner paper-piecing tips – www.chittenden.co.za

Day 29 – September 12 – Cheryl Sleboda: Needle threading tips – www.muppin.com

Day 30 – September 13 – Kim Niedzwiecki – Different thread weights and when to use them – www.gogokim.com

Day 31 – September 14 – Sandra Healy: Conquer Your Fear of Machine Appliqué – www.sandrahealydesigns.com

Day 32 – September 15 – Sandra Starley: The Basics of Antique Quilt Collecting – www.utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

 

WOOHOO! See you here on Tuesday!

 

]]>
https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/08/11/2017-back-to-school-blog-hop-for-sewists-is-coming-next-week/feed/ 8 5821
Why Stealing Patterns is Like Killing the Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/08/01/why-stealing-patterns-is-like-killing-the-goose-that-laid-the-golden-eggs/ https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/08/01/why-stealing-patterns-is-like-killing-the-goose-that-laid-the-golden-eggs/#comments Tue, 01 Aug 2017 13:38:30 +0000 https://huntersdesignstudio.com/?p=5771 It has happened AGAIN. Yep, stealing patterns, stealing content, copying pages from books.

This time, it’s in a Facebook group known as the Worldwide Quilting Group. The administrator, Sandy Stubbs, has been scraping tutorial and pattern content from other sites, stripping it of attribution or links to the original source, and posting it. MANY of our well known designers have had their content stolen, some even had pages of books copied.

The image below is a tutorial that was stolen from Jacquie Gering’s site:

 

STEALING IS WRONG. We all learned this as wee kiddos, and it’s still the law of the land. Yes, this IS stealing. I know a lot of people think it isn’t because, hey, it’s all free on the internet, right? But no. If you take something that ISN’T yours, it’s stealing, plain and simple. And there is no polite euphemism for thievery. If you stole a car you’d go to jail.

So I imagine that a rationalization could be that it’s not stealing if the content was free at its original source. But here’s the thing… we post free content to be traffic drivers to our sites. WE ARE IN BUSINESS. Being in business means we aim to make a living, to earn money from our talent and skill. It’s a well-known business idea to offer tutorial content for free to bring customers to our site and hopefully get a sale out of them – it’s the loss-leader concept of internet commerce, and it operates on the similar premise of the deeply discounted stuff at a big box store on any given weekend. I know that some people think that sullying the sweet face of crafting with bold business marketing is somehow unsavory, but for heaven’s sake! All who work in quilting are businesswomen and men. We are here to earn a living.

And while our living is in jeopardy every time someone copies a pattern, or steals content like this group above, the people who really lose out are our customers. When we find out our work is stolen we get closer to quitting in disgust, and it certainly makes us pull back on our generosity. When we quit, our customers lose the ability to find great patterns to make. We are the Geese that Lay the Golden Eggs, and when our eggs are stolen, we die an inch at a time. Eventually there will be no more eggs.

EVERY SINGLE ONE of our customers is responsible for protecting the rich content we make. 

Think hard about that.

The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs, illustrated by Milo Winter in a 1919 edition of Aesop’s Fables

Just about every quilt made relies as much on the pattern as it does on the fabric. And I can’t tell you how often I’ve heard “I spent all that money on fabric, I’m not spending another $10 on a pattern too.” And all I can say to that is, “Would you buy all the trimmings for thanksgiving dinner, and then steal the turkey?” No, you wouldn’t. And if you did, you’d be arrested.

So again, please:

**The above group blamed and attacked the content creators when they were challenged, and have since blocked anyone who brings up that this content is stolen. They have also hidden the group now. This is so very disappointing, and I hope that other members in the group continue to report their crimes outside the group. A classy group would have stayed public, apologized, deleted stolen content, and attributed/linked up free tutorials. 

And to those of you who DO pay for everything… blessings upon you and may your threads be never tangled! Thanks for hanging in with another post about stealing patterns. And yes… I’ll stop writing about theft when it stops happening.

]]>
https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/08/01/why-stealing-patterns-is-like-killing-the-goose-that-laid-the-golden-eggs/feed/ 42 5771
Windham Fabrics Christmas in July Blog Hop https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/07/18/windham-fabrics-christmas-in-july-blog-hop/ https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/07/18/windham-fabrics-christmas-in-july-blog-hop/#comments Tue, 18 Jul 2017 13:00:49 +0000 https://huntersdesignstudio.com/?p=5702 Today I’m sharing some construction tips for my new pattern, Holiday Snow Globes, as part of the Windham Fabrics Christmas in July Blog Hop. See the info at the end for a chance to win some fabric from me and the other stops in the hop!

I’m making a block from my pattern Holiday Snow Globes using a selection of holiday fabrics from the Sparkle, O’ Christmas Tree, and Santa’s Little Helpers lines from Whistler Studios for Windham Fabrics.

Holiday Snow Globes is a paper-pieced pattern, and you can construct it vertically for a wall hanging, or horizontally for a table runner. You can buy it here.

Below is a digital mockup using the Windham Fabrics… isn’t it sweet?! I love how the snowflake fabric works in the snowman! And the gray is actually beautiful and shimmery.

The Tree and Santa blocks are really easy – the entire globe section constructs in just one piece, and then the base of the snow globe is added as a second section. The Snowman is different: he has a few more pieces, but none of them are hard, so below is a quick tutorial on how he goes together.

First, print or copy all the paper-piecing patterns. I like to copy them onto newsprint as it’s lightweight and semi-transparent. It also tears off like a dream.

Separate the Snowman sections:

And tape the globes and bases together:

Here are the fabrics I’ll be using:

I like to precut my fabrics when I paper-piece. I cut them and stack them with each paper section, often in order. That way, when I take them to the machine I’m ready to sew.

Paper-piece the four sections of the Snowman (for paper-piecing tips, check YouTube or refer to the How to Paper Piece section in my book Quilt Talk):

Sew the sections together, and then pin the entire snowman to the globe section – this becomes piece number 1 of the next block!

Continue paper-picing the rest of the globe around the snowman:

Attach the globe base to finish the block!

To win a bundle of holiday fabrics from Windham, please comment BELOW. A random winner will be chosen on July 24th (entries close 8pm PST on July 23, 2017). This is open to everyone, both USA and international followers. You can also visit the rest of the stops for more chances to win some fabrics:

Monday, July 17– Chris Dodsley, Made by Chrissie D

Tuesday, July 18- Sam Hunter, Hunter’s Design Studio (you’re here!)

Wednesday, July 19 –Debby Kratovil, Debby Kratovil Quilts

Thursday, July 20- Brooke Sellmann, Silly Mama Quilts

Friday, July 21- Jennie at Clover and Violet

Saturday, July 22nd – Wendy Sheppard, Ivory Spring

 

BONUS CHANCE:

Head over to Instagram, follow me there (@huntersds), and leave a comment on the post with the image below. You’ll have a chance to win the fabrics, block, and pattern in the picture – everything you need to finish the quilt, including backing and binding (not batting though!) It’s a nice head start to making the quilt! I’ll randomly select a winner on July 24th also.

]]>
https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/07/18/windham-fabrics-christmas-in-july-blog-hop/feed/ 98 5702
Chunky Wee Bag – Bonus pocket modification https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/07/11/chunky-wee-bag-bonus-pocket-modification/ https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/07/11/chunky-wee-bag-bonus-pocket-modification/#comments Tue, 11 Jul 2017 13:00:52 +0000 https://huntersdesignstudio.com/?p=5662 A while back, I decided to adapt a large version of my Chunky Wee Bag pattern to be my travel handbag and a camera bag all in one. In the course of making the bag, I added a bonus pocket modification to the outer back of the bag, to carry things like maps a bit more accessibly. That pocket worked so well I’ve added it to all the Chunky Wee Bags I’ve made since!

It’s such a cool modification, so I thought I would detail it here for you, with pictures. You will still need the Chunky Wee Bag pattern if you make it 🙂 You can get it here. Oh, and here’s a humorous romp through how I designed the bag!

Cut the Outer Pocket fabric and fusible fleece:

  • For the LARGE bag, you’ll need a piece of fabric 15 1/2” wide x 17” tall, and a piece of fusible fleece 15 1/2” x 8 1/4”
  • For the MEDIUM bag, you’ll need a piece of fabric 13 1/2” wide x 12 1/2” tall, and a piece of fusible fleece 13 1/2” x 6”
  • For the SMALL bag, you’ll need a piece of fabric 11” wide x 10 1/2” tall, and a piece of fusible fleece 11” x 5”

My pix are of the MEDUIM bag – this is my daily handbag… I seem to need a new one every year, partly because I wear them out, and partly because new fabric always temps me – case in point, look at the robots on the flap!

Here we go! Follow the Chunky Wee Bag pattern until you reach step 10B.

Take the Outer Pocket fabric, fold WRONG sides together parallel to the width of the fabric and press in the crease at the fold. Refer to step 7 in the pattern – you’ll be following the Inner Pocket steps to make this Outer Pocket: nest the fusible fleece up in the fold, and iron it in.

Finish the folded top edge with a top stitch:

Take the Outer Bag section that does NOT have velcro on it – this is the back of the bag. Cut the corner squares from it per the instructions at 10B, first bullet.

Chalk a line 3/4” up from the square cut-outs (just like you did on the Pockets/Inner Bag instructions at step 8).

Align the Outer Pocket to the chalked line (just like in step 8), orienting the top-stitching down, and the raw edge up, with the raw edge at the line (and the rest of the back exposed).

Sew along this line a generous 1/4” from the raw edge, trying not to catch the fleece. This makes the pocket fold up more crisply, but it’s also not a huge deal if you do catch the fleece in the seam.

Flip the pocket up.

Following the drawing on the lower left of page 6 (step 8), chalk and sew the lines a half-inch in at the corners ONLY. Start from the bottom, and sew towards the top, back-tacking/lock-stitching well.

If the side pockets will be used for pens or reading glasses, sew a horizontal seam across the side pockets to make them a bit shallower. Test for the depth you need – I find that 5” works well for my cheater specs and pens.

Lock the stitches on that seam well, too.

Further segment the Outer Pocket (just like you did the inner pockets) if you need to. I leave mine the full size so that my sketchbook and e-reader fit in there.

Continue making the bag from step 10b. When you sew the sides of the outer bag together, be sure to catch the sides of the pockets in the seam too, and sew slowly through all those layers so as not to snap your needle!

 

Enjoy!

 

]]>
https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/07/11/chunky-wee-bag-bonus-pocket-modification/feed/ 3 5662
Thoughts on Pattern Quality https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/06/21/thoughts-on-pattern-quality/ https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/06/21/thoughts-on-pattern-quality/#comments Wed, 21 Jun 2017 13:00:37 +0000 https://huntersdesignstudio.com/?p=5587 Early in May I received an email from a reader who is quite frustrated with her recent purchases of patterns with costly cutting errors in them. She wrote to ask me to tackle this issue of pattern quality here on the blog. While I’m not a gun for hire for whatever bone someone wishes to pick with the quilting industry (!) I, of course, have a few thoughts on this, so here they are:

1. I can’t speak to what my friends and colleagues care about in their patterns writing endeavors, but I can tell you I have a mission statement for how I create mine. I don’t do this for fame and fortune (LOL!) I do it because I want people to have more fun making more stuff – I really consider pattern writing a SERVICE to both my industry and to our customers. MANY of my colleagues care just as much.

2. My reader asked “what the hell were the pattern testers doing?” My guess is they were trying their best. I have a core team* that reads and test-sews for me. Each of them have a specific area of skill that helps me – reading, drawings, flow, etc. Sadly though, ten people can look at a pattern and something still slips through. Whenever I’ve put a call out for new testers I never hear back from more than half the people who take the pattern draft. I will optimistically hope they had a “life happened” moment, and not presume they are just trying to get a free pattern out of me. And honestly, if they were, the joke’s on them as my first drafts can be pretty shaggy.

 

3A. My reader thought that testers were paid, which is seldom the case. I WISH I could pay my testers with cash; I send them patterns and occasionally other stuff, but it’s hardly equal to their work (I’m not given enough fabric to forward as compensation). Our industry is lucky to have a mostly kind fan base, and I’m beyond lucky that I have my team. They help because they want us/me to succeed. They think their effort is a worthy contribution for the betterment of the industry. That said, they are humans and therefore they goof up. As do I. I have a page where all errors are listed, and am sweatily relieved that most of my errors have been small, and not in the realm of the expensively large cut my reader was rightly upset about.

3B. Why can’t I pay them? Honestly, the profit margin at my end of a $12 pattern (that sells through a distributor to a shop) is in the neighborhood of $3.50. And sadly, it’s not enough for paying testers AND eating. Yes, I get all the profits from a PDF sold directly from my site, but it also takes about 100 hours to fully produce a pattern. And before you imagine my earnings are “bonus” in my family (like old-fashioned pin money) let me clarify for you that I have no husband, partner, other job, or trust fund. It’s just me.

3C. Why isn’t my income higher? The profits at the designer end just aren’t that high, so we rely on volume (and we have stores going out of business everywhere). While many of my customers respect what I do and happily pay for my design skills (and I adore you all for that), I’m sad to report that we still have a LOT of people who think that patterns should be free. These thieves copy our patterns far and wide to all their pals. A POX ON THEIR SEWING MACHINES.

4. My reader was upset that she didn’t get a reply when she wrote to a designer about an error. Again, all I can say is I write back as soon as I can, but within business hours – not at all hours of the night and weekends because really, this is quilting, not emergency medicine. Sometimes, the technology gremlins foil me, but I’m as responsive as I can be, and I care about fixing errors (see 1 above). And PLEASE check your junk/spam folder before presuming you didn’t get a response.

5A. My reader feels tempted to complain to her IG following to get the attention of the designer in question. To which I say, BE CAREFUL THERE. Yes, you get to say you’re not happy, but I think you should fear creating a social media pile-on of hate, because that’s what WILL happen. We have far too much hate in our world already, and the internet proves over and over again that people say the most horrible things from the anonymity of the keyboard. If you wouldn’t say it to their face, don’t type in on the internet. One way to handle this would be to become respected for writing thoughtful pattern reviews, giving equal weight to the things that worked out, not just the ones that don’t. Really, if you had a good time with a pattern, let the designer know (my most favorite emails!) and tell your friends with as much fervor as when you run into an error.

6. How do we ensure pattern quality? I wish I knew. We have a lot of new designers flooding into the industry, and while some of their ideas are brilliant, their skills at writing that brilliance down haven’t caught up yet. Some of them are willing to improve, others don’t seem to care – which mirrors every other industry on the planet. Yes, a global pattern review site would be lovely, but few people would be willing to pay to access it – and it would need to be paid for as it would be a huge undertaking to build and run. At the moment, word of mouth is what we have.

I hope fervently that my industry colleagues care as much as I do to make the best product possible for our customers, and I know many who do. When we all step up, and we can all rise together.

I, for one, think YOU’RE worth the effort.

 

* My core team are Monica, Ursula, the ‘Flakes, the SLO Creative Crew, and the Lucky 13 Ladies – thank you!

]]>
https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/06/21/thoughts-on-pattern-quality/feed/ 36 5587
Spring 2017 – New Patterns! https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/06/15/spring-2017-new-patterns/ https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/06/15/spring-2017-new-patterns/#comments Thu, 15 Jun 2017 13:41:57 +0000 https://huntersdesignstudio.com/?p=5600 I released four new patterns for Spring Quilt Market and they’re in the shop now!

As always, HUGE THANKS to my test crew: Monica, Ursula, Barbara, Flaun, Jean, Kimberly, Trish, Megan, and Janet and the SLO Creative Test Crew. And more HUGE THANKS to Kazumi Peterson of K.Peterson Quilting for making my quilts look so pretty!

First up, one for the holidays! I know… but all the holiday fabric is coming into the store right now 🙂

This is Holiday Snow Globes, and can be made either vertically for a wall hanging, or horizontally for a table runner. It’s all easy paper-piecing and a few sashing strips. Check out the sweet faces (and quilting) on Santa and the Snowman:

 

 

Next is Dashing Dots:

This design is inspired by a print in the latest fabric line from Janine Vangool, Uppercase Volume 2: Dots, Dashes and Diamonds (with her permission). The blocks are 14” finished. The pattern has five sizes from Lap to King, and includes two different sashing options:

 

Bloomin’ Too is the next pattern (a sister to the original Bloomin’):

I love how cheerful this pattern is! The flowers and leaves are paper-pieced and set with simple squares and rectangles. It’s a great stash-buster too.

And last is Fourteen Wheeler, the 6th in the series of “planned improv” quilts made with just 14 fat quarters – this time with pinwheels for the featured block:

 

And of course, I have some to give away! Please leave me a comment, and tell me what you’re working on right now.

I’ll choose TWO winners on Sunday June 18th!

 

 

]]>
https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/06/15/spring-2017-new-patterns/feed/ 17 5600
The ORANGE and White Collection https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/06/08/the-orange-and-white-collection/ https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/06/08/the-orange-and-white-collection/#comments Thu, 08 Jun 2017 12:00:17 +0000 https://huntersdesignstudio.com/?p=5549 Have you seen the red and white quilts of the Infinite Variety collection? They made a big splash at the American Folk Art Museum in 2011, and I was lucky enough to see some of them at Houston Quilt Market/Festival a couple of years back.

Image from the American Folk Art Museum

I’ve always been a fan of the graphic nature of two-color quilts, and seeing the red and white quilts got me thinking about building my own collection, but with ORANGE and white quilts! I remembered a quilt I bought back in the early 1990s…

Twenty-some years ago, there was a cable program that showed antique quilts for sale. Many of the ladies in my quilt guild spent their weekends glued to this show, calling in to pounce on the vintage treasures. This was before the internet became a household thing (something I can barely imagine now!) I fell pray to watching that show one weekend, and this lovely ORANGE and white Snail’s Trail joined my household shortly thereafter:

 

 

I’ve often said it was waiting just for me to love it. It’s from the 1930s, machine-pieced but hand-quilted. If you’ve ever seen me lecture, I often bring this quilt with me. I love to show how imperfectly made it is, and how none of that detracts from its beauty. This quilt really taught me to appreciate seeing the hand of the maker, and it has always been so precious to me because many points miss and the ORANGE fabric shadows under the white in a lot of places.

Anyway, until this spring, it was the only antique quilt I owned. And then I found this Drunkards Path on Ebay:

 

 

So I bought it. Now there were two. A fledgling collection was hatched! Look closely… you’ll see that the outer row of blocks is from a slightly darker fabric. Running out of fabric is obviously a timeless problem!

And then a few weeks ago, my friend Lori found this quilt top and nabbed it for me:

 

 

It’s a hot mess of stretchy bias edges and funky points. Just look at how several of the center stars are, shall we say… irregular! It’s hand-pieced and I wish I knew if it was made by one or many people. I adore it. And I guess the ORANGE and White Collection is truly underway now 🙂

I’ve looked through Barbara Brackman’s Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt patterns and I can’t identify this pattern at all. Does anyone have any thoughts about it?

And should I design a pattern inspired by it? I promise to do it without leaving bias on the edges!

 

]]>
https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/06/08/the-orange-and-white-collection/feed/ 11 5549
Spring Clean Your Studio 2017 – New Studio! https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/05/10/spring-clean-your-studio-2017-new-studio/ https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/05/10/spring-clean-your-studio-2017-new-studio/#comments Wed, 10 May 2017 12:00:24 +0000 https://huntersdesignstudio.com/?p=5437 We are in the middle of this year’s edition of Spring Clean Your Studio, a fun blog hop devised by Cheryl Sleboda of Muppin.com!

I moved at the end of last year, so I have a new studio to share!

As I’ve written before, I’m a pretty tidy person in general, so what feels messy to me might look like like a clean space to you. I’m coming off an intense couple of months of sewing for Spring Quilt Market, so while that’s underway, I tend to stack things in piles on my biggest available surface – the top of my fabric drawers:

 

(I would have taken pix at the height of the chaos, but there was a lot of secret fabric in there that I’m not allowed to share until after it debuts at Market)

A lot of the fabric drawers were so tight that I could barely get my hands in them, and I find this really unpleasant to deal with; it makes me want to just not use the fabric in there, which then leads to shopping trips (and often to duplicate purchases!) Thus the first order of business was to re-sort the drawers, and then to file away all the fabric on top of them.

I have a lot of hand-dyed fabric, and while I don’t want to get rid of it (I use when I teach hand-dyeing) I don’t need it at the ready. I decided to pull it from the drawers and move it into storage tubs that can live in my office closet.

This freed up three drawers for shifting and filing the rest:

I still have some batting to absorb, but I’ll get to that soon – it’s destined to be frankenbatted into some charity quilts for my guild. I also want to have a good sort on the rack at the back of the picture, but that will have to wait a week or two while I finish up my market obligations.

I store fabric mostly by type/substrate (batik, cotton, barkcloth, canvas) and then by genre (solid, print, etc.) I have specific drawers for fabric with text, skulls, and robots/space. Some of the fabric is sorted by manufacturer – this is so that when I design with it, I don’t inadvertently mix in other companies’ fabrics. I also broke up all my fat quarter towers this time as then I’ll actually use the fabrics in them – seriously… I had some that are 4 or 5 years old that had never been touched.

I keep large cuts of solids in the drawers, but the main solid stash (mostly fat quarters and smaller) lives in smaller boxes:

I’m not a scrap quilter, so while I set aside scraps as I work, I periodically bundle them up to giveaway on Instagram (follow me here!) My next round of giveaways will include scraps from the quilts I made for this market season out of fabric that isn’t out just yet 🙂

 

I think the most important thing about fabric storage is to find what works best for you, and to do it in a way that makes your fabric available to you for both inspiration and use. If you can’t get to it, it can’t get used!

I don’t need to see all mine out on a shelf, so having it in drawers works fine. I also would never bother with storing it around boards as it would take up way too much space to do that. I store by type and color, but I know other people work well storing by size.

I’m also a fan of periodically sorting through your entire stash, both to sort in the new treasures and to purge the old. I think we all buy fabric that we outgrow before it gets used, and if you get it out of the house you have room to buy more! I send my no-longer-loved fabric to my guild’s robust charity quilting program, or our monthly Free Fabric table. Your local Project Linus group is always a good place for fabric you don’t want to keep.

The whole studio! I find tidy space so inviting!

Please check out the rest of the blog hop!

May 1 – Teri Lucas – www.terificreations.com
May 2 – Tammy Silvers – www.tamarinis.typepad.com
May 3 – Emily Breclaw – www.thecaffeinatedquilter.com
May 4 – Amalia Morusiewicz – www.FUNfromAtoZ.com
May 5 – John Kubiniec – www.bigrigquilting.com/blog/
May 6 – Debby Brown – www.higheredhands.blogspot.com
May 7 – Melissa Marie Collins – www.melissamariecollins.blogspot.com
May 8 – Delve MIY – www.fronddesignstudios.wordpress.com
May 9 – Misty Cole – www.mistycole.com
May 10 – Sam Hunter – www.huntersdesignstudio.com/blog (you’re here!)
May 11 – Dale Ashera-Davis – www.dalead.wordpress.com
May 12 – Sara Mika – www.mockpiestudio.blogspot.com
May 13 – Sarah Trumpp – www.Wonderstrumpet.com
May 14 – Carma Halterman – www.beanstrings.blogspot.com
May 15 – Jessica Darling – www.jessicakdarling.com
May 16 – Lisa Chin – www.lisachinartist.com
May 17 – Sally Johnson – www.sallysquiltingcorner.blogspot.com
May 18 – Mandy Leins – www.mandalei.com/blog
May 19 – Shruti Dandekar – www.13woodhouseroad.com
May 20 – Jane Davila – www.janedavila.com
May 21 – Ebony Love – www.lovebugstudios.com
May 22 – Cheryl Sleboda – blog.muppin.com

 

 

]]>
https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/05/10/spring-clean-your-studio-2017-new-studio/feed/ 2 5437
Star Wars Patterns – ChickTech Donation 2017 1st Quarter https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/04/04/star-wars-patterns-chicktech-donation-2017-1st-quarter/ https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/04/04/star-wars-patterns-chicktech-donation-2017-1st-quarter/#comments Tue, 04 Apr 2017 13:00:39 +0000 https://huntersdesignstudio.com/?p=5347 What can I say…. YOU ROCK!

A couple of weeks ago I released my latest Star Wars pattern, General Organa, and made it a pay-what-you-can pattern. I designated the proceeds to Chick Tech, a nationwide non-profit organization dedicated to retaining women in the technology workforce, and increasing the number of women and girls pursuing technology-based careers.

Your response has been SO lovely! Many of you donated beyond the suggested price, and when the sales were totaled I was able to make a $221 donation to the organization today!

Thank you for your part in making this happen – it makes it possible for me to keep designing Star Wars patterns for a great cause!

 

]]>
https://huntersdesignstudio.com/2017/04/04/star-wars-patterns-chicktech-donation-2017-1st-quarter/feed/ 1 5347